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The 34-year-old Maine native did her first triathlon when, after a few too many drinks, she bet her friend that she could beat him in a triathlon with no training. Piampiano not only won the bet but also found a new career path—one that inspired her to ditch her high-pressure investment banking career and partying lifestyle. A lifelong athlete, she found early success in amateur racing (including a top American amateur finish at the Ironman World Championship) then turned pro in late 2011. She won Ironman 70.3 New Orleans in 2012—her third race as a pro—and has been working her way up the triathlon ranks.
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Meet Sarah Piampiano: Overworked Banker to Ironman Winner

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Sarah Piampiano is not your typ­i­cal ath­lete. Although she might now be one of the world’s top female triath­letes (she placed 1st at Iron­man 70.3 New Orleans ear­lier this year), she cer­tainly didn’t start out that way. In fact, until 2009, Piampiano worked 100-hour weeks in the finan­cial world, par­tied a bit too much and exer­cised close to nothing.
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Day in the Life with Sarah Piampiano: My 5 Key IRONMAN Lessons

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Before I completed my first IRONMAN in Coeur D’Alene in 2011, I was completely and utterly scared. Despite being fit and well trained, I still didn’t know if I’d be able to make it through the whole race. The fear of the unknown left me, a control freak, feeling out of control. I wanted to cry on race morning and could hardly force food down my throat. More than once before the cannon went off I thought to myself, “I don’t want to do this!”
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PRE-RACE PREP WITH SARAH PIAMPIANO

 

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Race morning can be a stressful time for athletes, so the more organised you are, the less you have to think about, and hopefully, the stress levels can be kept at a minimum. We caught up with professional triathlete, Sarah Piampiano at Ironman Austria a few weeks ago and were impressed by her pre-race preparation and organisation. On a scale of 1 to OCD, she’s right up there, but it works. Meanwhile, we’re struggling to remember where we left our diary, let alone make a list in one.
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A DAY, WEEK AND MONTH IN THE LIFE OF SARAH PIAMPIANO

 

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My race season is in full swing, which makes life a bit chaotic. Since March I feel like I have been packing for a race or training camp, on the road, tapering, racing, recovering, unpacking, playing catch up on life, and then repeating the whole process over again. It can be tough to manage, but the key through all of it is to stay on top of sleep, nutrition and recovery. Letting any of those slip can lead to negative consequences – poor training or racing performance, getting sick, and even getting injured.
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Day in the Life with Sarah Piampiano: Bounce Back Faster

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The last eight weeks have been jam-packed. Since March 18th, I’ve raced IRONMAN 70.3’s in Monterrey, Oceanside, New Orleans, and Galveston, as well as IRONMAN Texas. Racing with such frequency requires careful management, an open mind and a willingness to experiment and learn what works for you and what doesn’t.
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Day in the Life with Sarah Piampiano: Open Water Tips

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May has been an interesting month for me. Since January, I’ve been struggling with some significant GI issues, and in the two weeks between IRONMAN 70.3 Monterrey and IRONMAN 70.3 Oceanside, things got ugly. I finally went to the doctor and was diagnosed with giardia, which is a parasite that wreaks havoc on your gut. A course of medicine later, and I am feeling much better.

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Day in the Life with Sarah Piampiano: 5 Ways to Win at Life

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Whether you are a professional or amateur athlete, competing for the win, or “winning” by simply finishing the race, we all have similar fears and struggles. We are all nervous for the swim, we are worry about gastrointestinal issues, we all wonder if we have hydrated well enough or about the niggle in our shoulder. And we all struggle with life balance and relationships.

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Good Habits Die Hard

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Sarah Piampiano is a woman on a mission: she wants to inspire people to break bad habits and replace them with good ones. This is an area that the professional athlete has personal experience in, as she committed to her first triathlon over a pack of cigarettes and too many drinks in 2009. Taking a bet that she could beat her friend in the race—untrained—and then winning that bet changed her life forever. She has been traveling the world competing in Ironman races since, and quit her banking job at HSBC in 2012 to become a professional triathlete.
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Sarah Piampiano: Banker Turned Triathlete

 

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I am so excited to introduce you all to Sarah Piampiano, a truly inspirational figure with an amazing story of how she became one of the world’s top female professional triathletes. Sarah was kind enough to agree to an interview where she shares her story and offers valuable advice for anyone looking to enter triathletes and have a healthier lifestyle.
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Wall Street to World Triathlons

 

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Six years ago Sarah Piampiano, 34, was an out-of-shape, workaholic Wall Street investment banker, who survived on a couple of hours’ sleep a night and puffed her way through two packets of cigarettes a day.

Today she is one of the world’s top female professional triathletes, having ditched both her corporate job and her smoking habit in favour of travelling the world, competing in the sport she loves.
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Check My Endurance: Interview with Sarah Piampiano

 

In this episode, we interview pro triathlete Sarah Piampiano. Sarah gives a good insight on the business side of being a pro triathlete, how she got into the sport, dealing with a long injury, sports as a child, her new project and much more.

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Sarah Piampiano’s Unlikely Road from Investment Banker to Elite Triathlete

 

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In the fall of 2009, Sarah Piampiano was having drinks with an old college friend who was getting ready to compete in a triathlon. Spurred on by a lifelong competitive spirit and a bit too much liquid courage, Piampiano bet him that she’d finish in front of him — without any training at all.
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